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A Kelpie Walking Trail


A Kelpie Walking Trail

Meandering gently around town, the Kelpie Walking Trail links 5 unique sculptures revealing the fascinating life and times of the Kelpie.
The statues feature interpretive signage and the walker can chose from three routes.
Route 1 will take you via the main shopping district with its heritage-themed streetscape, while Route 2 is slightly longer and takes in some wonderful River Red-Gums and riverbank.
Route 3 comprises the River Walking Trail, along the beautiful banks of the Glenelg River.

Ess Lagoon


Ess Lagoon

The picturesque Ess Lagoon offers a tranquil picnic and fishing area and is regularly stocked with trout (A comprehensive Fishing Guide available at Casterton Visitor Information Centre).

Longlead Swamp Track


Longlead Swamp Track is further west (about 11 km from Casterton) along the highway (signposted to the right). It is another bush track with wildflowers and barbecue facilities. There are waterbirds, kangaroos and emus.

Park and recreation areas in and around Casterton


Park and recreation areas in and around Casterton

Apex Park, next to the Visitor Information Centre is a popular BBQ stop. Both Bryan Park near the hospital and the Lions Memorial Park, near the Jack Gleeson statue on the riverbank have fun playgrounds for the kids.

Island Park Recreation Reserve offers a full range of sporting facilities including a Caravan Park, BBQ, playground, Olympic swimming pool, bowling club, croquet lawn, tennis courts and sports ovals. Casterton also has an 18-hole golf course, racecourse and indoor sporting facilities.

  • Visit Warrock Homestead, open daily.
  • Drive to Mickle Lookout, for fantastic scenic views over Casterton.
  • Casterton's main street shopping area - including specialty stores, antique/collectables shops, and eateries.
  • Have a picnic, do some fishing or watch the bird life at Ess Lagoon.
  • Check out the local art galleries.
  • Wander the Old Casterton Cemetery.
  • Meander along the Kelpie Walking Trail to view five unique kelpie sculptures, historic parts of Casterton and parkland and reserves.
  • Visit the Wilkin Flora and Fauna Reserve and take a picnic, bird watch or admire the wildflowers in season (August- October).
  • Keep and eye out for the rare Red Tailed Black Cockatoo-the Olympic mascot for the 2006 Commonwealth Games.

Railway Reserve


Railway Reserve

The Railway Reserve features a railway-themed playground and shady rotunda.

The Bilstons Tree


The Bilstons Tree

About 10 or 15 km further north along the Chetwynd Rd is a signposted turnoff on the left to Bilstons Tree which is considered to have the largest volume of millable river red gum in the world. It is thought to be 800 years old and stands over 40 m high with a girth of seven metres, consisting of 9100 cubic feet of timber.

The Carmichael Track


The Carmichael Track is signposted off the Casterton-Penola Rd (the Glenelg Highway), west of Casterton. The main picnic area (which has barbecue and toilet facilities) is readily accessible by car but a 4WD is required to venture further at certain times of the year. The walking track leads through an abundance of wildflowers in season, though it is pleasant at any time of the year.

The Dergholm State Park and Baileys Rocks


The Dergholm State Park and Baileys Rocks

Baileys Rocks are a series of enormous and unusual green-coloured granite boulders in a dry creek bed within the northern section of Dergholm State Park. Follow the Apsley Rd (aka the Naracoorte Rd) north-west for about 39 km (about 6 km beyond the settlement of Dergholm) and a signposted turnoff on the right leads to the Baileys Rocks Picnic and Camping Area where there are toilets, fuel barbecues, picnic tables, drinking water and two walking tracks. A short (3230-metre) loop track leads to the boulders while the Rocky Creek Trail (5 km return) starts further upstream. It is clearly marked by blue arrows and is about 5 km return.
There are also driving tracks in the park which features a diversity of vegetation (woodlands, open forests, heath and swamp communities and spectacular spring wildflowers) and fauna (red-tailed black cockatoos, swift parrots, echidnas, koalas, grey kangaroos and a range of reptiles). A spotlight walk at night may afford a glimpse of nocturnal animal life such as sugar gliders.

The park covers 10 400 ha and is divided into two blocks which are separated by the Dergholm-Edenhope Rd. Once occupied by the Kanal gundidj clan (part of the Jardwadjali language group), it was declared a Park in 1992. Ring (03) 5581 2427 for further details.

 



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